A 1946 CJ2A has arrived in VintageDonVille!!

Stakebed

Well Oiled
All-Star
Mar 4, 2020
6,866
Northern California
First Name
Joe
Willys Model
  1. Pickup
Willys Year:
  1. 1957
Don, I mean this as a compliment. Your attention to detail is going to make some future owner of Willa Dean and Chuffy a very pleased Willys owner.

Question on the captured nut. On Jab's picture, is the nut inside the tubing or is the nut missing?
20220113_221600.jpg

Initially I thought the nut was inside the tubing and that is why you wrote about cutting a square hole. But then your following pictures look like your captured nut is outside the tubing.
 

Vintage Don

Well Oiled
All-Star
Oct 9, 2017
3,496
Medina, Ohio
First Name
Don
Willys Model
  1. Pickup
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
@Bitzf4 - Walcks has them.


Screenshot_20220114-074324_Chrome.jpg


Here's the video, with Carl -


@Stakebed - yeah, I didn't do a very good job of "photo documenting" that part.... we pushed the nut down inside. In the first photo where you're seeing the square hole, the nut assembly is laying there beside the square hole upside down from how it actually got installed. (Jabby's nut is in there - his is a less bulky design than what I used).

Then in the next photo where it's installed, there's a really big mound of gubbered up weld all around it. Which I ground smooth. There would not be ROOM for the nut to be on the outside - it wouldn't clear the seat back. But the "wings" on either side of the nut cage are still on the outside of the tube. (It'll never pull through, that's for sure! haha)
 
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Stakebed

Well Oiled
All-Star
Mar 4, 2020
6,866
Northern California
First Name
Joe
Willys Model
  1. Pickup
Willys Year:
  1. 1957
@Bitzf4 - Walcks has them.


View attachment 114204


Here's the video, with Carl -


@Stakebed - yeah, I didn't do a very good job of "photo documenting" that part.... we pushed the nut down inside. In the first photo where you're seeing the square hole, the nut assembly is laying there beside the square hole upside down from how it actually got installed. (Jabby's nut is in there - his is a less bulky design than what I used).

Then in the next photo where it's installed, there's a really big mound of gubbered up weld all around it. Which I ground smooth. There would not be ROOM for the nut to be on the outside - it wouldn't clear the seat back. But the "wings" on either side of the nut cage are still on the outside of the tube. (It'll never pull through, that's for sure! haha)
Understood, thank you.
 

Vintage Don

Well Oiled
All-Star
Oct 9, 2017
3,496
Medina, Ohio
First Name
Don
Willys Model
  1. Pickup
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
OK, so nobody got real excited about the 'hidden capture nut into the seat frame' adventure. I get that. I guess it was a big deal to me because it concluded a coupla different originally confusing things I was chasing - for a long while - and finally got to the Finish Line with 'em.

So here's some other things I've been chasing today.

Nearly a year ago, I started trying to pull together all the pieces that are unique to the early Column Shift set up. There's a lot of such pieces, and some are really hard to find. Like the cover plate over the transmission. No floor shift lever sticking through means it's a different plate, obviously. And it has a little "bump" on it, to give clearance for the transmission breather. Found a really rough one, from this '46 VEC, slowly going back to nature up in Michigan -

Screenshot_20210127-134349_Messenger.jpg

I debated if it was good enough to use, it was deeply pitted when it arrived.

20220114_222110.jpg

But over the past several months, I would mess with it once in a while. Sandblast, coupla times, acid etch, sand on it.... a little filler, sand it more... Eventually, I felt like it was maybe worth squirting some paint on, to match Chuffy's floor.

20220114_221215.jpg

So yeah, it came out pretty decent. I won't install it until I do the sizeable project of converting back to column shift of course, which will be in "Phase Two" - after I get Chuffy back on the road first.

And then today, I was messing with all the little fasteners and small parts that go with the manifold set. It'll soon be time to assemble that back onto the engine. And I had to get all the right pieces found or bought. (I also made up a second set of the heat riser parts for the "spare engine" which @gasoil sent me from Vermont. Slowly getting all the stuff in hand for that engine build later, too.)

Sprayed all the small parts with that "Very High Temp" (VHT) paint which you then have to cure in the oven. 30 minutes at 250° then cool down. Then, 30 minutes at 400°, cool, and one more time at 600. That procedure makes them real hard and temp resistant, I've had good luck with it holding up pretty good. (Tim tells me I'm "officially insane.")

Finicky stuff, painting fasteners...

Well, The Bride is long-since used to my madness, of course, and humors me. I brought the oven rack out to the Shop to attach the fasteners, to get them baked/cured.

20220114_121134.jpg

Carried that inside, and got the process started.

20220114_121040.jpg

She took it from there for me.

Footnote: my timing was bad! She was gonna make fresh, homemade bread today. Like flour, and yeast and stuff - from scratch. But now that's been delayed.... Dang! Cause it's really GOOD!

Got them cured, and all sorted. Takes a while. (@scramboleer likes these kind of photos! haha)

Resized_20220114_171035.jpeg

Extra set of heat riser stuff off on the right there.

Even got Chuffy's heat riser assembled. Those always make me dyslexic - which way does the spring, and coil, and arm go.... But got it done - and a little heat shows that it works right.

20220114_221032.jpg

Then, I moved under the vehicle and started a mock-up dry assembly of the fuel pump and that oil filter line. Looking straight up from underneath here -

20220114_221111.jpg

That job's kinda miserable work, getting that stuff together. Wanted to practice once, before I do it "to stay" with the goop on it.

And that's another exciting day here, as the sun sets in Medina, Ohio....

(Actually from a few days ago - had a real vivid, pretty one.)

20220113_204748.jpg


.
 
Last edited:

Bitzf4

Precision Fit
All-Star
Oct 13, 2020
608
Hastings mn
First Name
Jim
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
OK, so nobody got real excited about the 'hidden capture nut into the seat frame' adventure. I get that. I guess it was a big deal to me because it concluded a coupla different originally confusing things I was chasing - for a long while - and finally got to the Finish Line with 'em.

So here's some other things I've been chasing today.

Nearly a year ago, I started trying to pull together all the pieces that are unique to the early Column Shift set up. There's a lot of pieces, and some are really hard to find. Like the cover plate over the transmission. No floor shift lever sticking through means it's a different plate, obviously. And it has a little "bump" on it, to give clearance for the transmission breather. Found a really rough one, from this '46 VEC, slowly going back to nature up in Michigan -

View attachment 114273

I debated if it was good enough to use, it was deeply pitted when it arrived.

View attachment 114274

But over the past several months, I would mess with it once in a while. Sandblast, coupla times, acid etch, sand on it.... a little filler, sand it more... Eventually, I felt like it was maybe worth squirting some paint on, to match Chuffy's floor.

View attachment 114275

So yeah, it came out pretty decent. I won't install it until I do the sizeable project of converting back to column shift of course, which will be in "Phase Two" - after I get Chuffy back on the road first.

And then today, I was messing with all the little fasteners and small parts that go with the manifold set. It'll soon be time to assemble that back onto the engine. And I had to get all the right pieces found or bought. (I also made up a second set of the heat riser parts for the "spare engine" which @gasoil sent me from Vermont. Slowly getting all the stuff in hand for that engine build later, too.)

Sprayed all the small parts with that "Very High Temp" (VHT) paint which you then have to cure in the oven. 30 minutes at 250° then cool down. Then, 30 minutes at 400°, cool, and one more time at 600. That procedure makes them real hard and temp resistant, I've had good luck with it holding up pretty good. (Tim tells me I'm "officially insane.")

Finicky stuff, painting fasteners...

Well, The Bride is long-since used to my madness, of course, and humors me. I brought the oven rack out to the Shop to attach the fasteners, to get them baked/cured.

View attachment 114276

Carried that inside, and got the process started.

View attachment 114277

She took it from there for me.

Footnote: my timing was bad! She was gonna make fresh, homemade bread today. Like flour, and yeast and stuff - from scratch. But now that's been delayed.... Dang! Cause it's really GOOD!

Got them cured, and all sorted. Takes a while. (@scramboleer likes these kind of photos! haha)

View attachment 114278

Extra set of heat riser stuff off on the right there.

Even got Chuffy's heat riser assembled. Those always make me dyslexic - which way does the spring, and coil, and arm go.... But got it done - and a little heat shows that it works right.

View attachment 114279

Then, I moved under the vehicle and started a mock-up dry assembly of the fuel pump and that oil filter line. Looking straight up from underneath here -

View attachment 114281

That job's kinda miserable work, getting that stuff together. Wanted to practice once, before I do it "to stay" with the goop on it.

And that's another exciting day here, as the sun sets in Medina, Ohio....

(Actually from a few days ago - had a real vivid, pretty one.)

View attachment 114280


.
I think your recovered plates a winner Don. Nice work.

Bitz
 

pixman

Bigger Hammer
Jul 24, 2019
132
Wadsworth Ohio
First Name
Jeffrey
Willys Model
  1. Other
Willys Year:
  1. Other
V.D. is soaring perilously close to ''National Treasure" status through his incredibly meticulous craft & work, and the friendly, precise and arduous documentation he freely shares. You can't BUY this _ _ _ _ . I may NEVER hear the end of it!
 

Vintage Don

Well Oiled
All-Star
Oct 9, 2017
3,496
Medina, Ohio
First Name
Don
Willys Model
  1. Pickup
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
National Treasure, eh? Hahaha - I'm gonna have to save this post, and use it to defend myself, later..... but appreciated.

Also appreciate the other replies here, very much!

I'm out in the Shop now - and I'm pretty sure I'm over-thinking this whole engine build in Chuffy....

This all stems from the fact that I'm assembling the engine IN THE VEHICLE. I've gotten spoiled, building them on the Run Stand - where you can easily get at stuff. "In the vehicle" reminds me of all these fun things like trying to start the fuel pump bolts. Ha

Here's what I'm going back and forth about now.

Yesterday, I did my trial fit of the oil line up-and-over to the oil filter cannister, and the fuel pump. The reason being, I'm trying to decide/remember if I need to do a "permanent install" on that oil line first (because it's kinda behind the fuel pump), and then install the fuel pump to stay. Or if I can sneak that oil line in and out after the fuel pump is installed... (I know I gotta have that brass 90 it attaches to in there first, before the fuel pump goes on.)

But the cylinder head is not on there yet. If I "go permanent" with the oil line, then I've got that damn oil filter in the way up top, when I go to set the cylinder head back on. So now, I'm wondering if maybe I should just put the cylinder head back on first - and then do the install of fuel pump, oil line, etc. How will I make things more difficult by the cylinder head already being there, if I put it on first? The more I think about it, I think I should just put the cylinder head on first. It won't be in the way of setting the manifolds, or anything else that I can foresee at this point.......
 

Bitzf4

Precision Fit
All-Star
Oct 13, 2020
608
Hastings mn
First Name
Jim
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
V.D. is soaring perilously close to ''National Treasure" status through his incredibly meticulous craft & work, and the friendly, precise and arduous documentation he freely shares. You can't BUY this _ _ _ _ . I may NEVER hear the end of it!
Maybe come up with a better acronym than V.D. Sounds like a disease

Maybe Darth Vader.
 

Bitzf4

Precision Fit
All-Star
Oct 13, 2020
608
Hastings mn
First Name
Jim
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
OK, so nobody got real excited about the 'hidden capture nut into the seat frame' adventure. I get that. I guess it was a big deal to me because it concluded a coupla different originally confusing things I was chasing - for a long while - and finally got to the Finish Line with 'em.

So here's some other things I've been chasing today.

Nearly a year ago, I started trying to pull together all the pieces that are unique to the early Column Shift set up. There's a lot of such pieces, and some are really hard to find. Like the cover plate over the transmission. No floor shift lever sticking through means it's a different plate, obviously. And it has a little "bump" on it, to give clearance for the transmission breather. Found a really rough one, from this '46 VEC, slowly going back to nature up in Michigan -

View attachment 114273

I debated if it was good enough to use, it was deeply pitted when it arrived.

View attachment 114274

But over the past several months, I would mess with it once in a while. Sandblast, coupla times, acid etch, sand on it.... a little filler, sand it more... Eventually, I felt like it was maybe worth squirting some paint on, to match Chuffy's floor.

View attachment 114275

So yeah, it came out pretty decent. I won't install it until I do the sizeable project of converting back to column shift of course, which will be in "Phase Two" - after I get Chuffy back on the road first.

And then today, I was messing with all the little fasteners and small parts that go with the manifold set. It'll soon be time to assemble that back onto the engine. And I had to get all the right pieces found or bought. (I also made up a second set of the heat riser parts for the "spare engine" which @gasoil sent me from Vermont. Slowly getting all the stuff in hand for that engine build later, too.)

Sprayed all the small parts with that "Very High Temp" (VHT) paint which you then have to cure in the oven. 30 minutes at 250° then cool down. Then, 30 minutes at 400°, cool, and one more time at 600. That procedure makes them real hard and temp resistant, I've had good luck with it holding up pretty good. (Tim tells me I'm "officially insane.")

Finicky stuff, painting fasteners...

Well, The Bride is long-since used to my madness, of course, and humors me. I brought the oven rack out to the Shop to attach the fasteners, to get them baked/cured.

View attachment 114276

Carried that inside, and got the process started.

View attachment 114277

She took it from there for me.

Footnote: my timing was bad! She was gonna make fresh, homemade bread today. Like flour, and yeast and stuff - from scratch. But now that's been delayed.... Dang! Cause it's really GOOD!

Got them cured, and all sorted. Takes a while. (@scramboleer likes these kind of photos! haha)

View attachment 114278

Extra set of heat riser stuff off on the right there.

Even got Chuffy's heat riser assembled. Those always make me dyslexic - which way does the spring, and coil, and arm go.... But got it done - and a little heat shows that it works right.

View attachment 114279

Then, I moved under the vehicle and started a mock-up dry assembly of the fuel pump and that oil filter line. Looking straight up from underneath here -

View attachment 114281

That job's kinda miserable work, getting that stuff together. Wanted to practice once, before I do it "to stay" with the goop on it.

And that's another exciting day here, as the sun sets in Medina, Ohio....

(Actually from a few days ago - had a real vivid, pretty one.)

View attachment 114280


.
Darth Vader.I am leaning on the VHT satin gray for the motor. Satin black for the manifolds. Are you using flat or satin and are your manifolds different colors or just the nature of the surface. Also. Did you prime and if so with VHT primer.

Update. VHT only comes in flat for the flame thrower version which is +1300 f. Engine paint comes in either and rated to 550+ f

Is 550 high enough for the manifolds. (Or motor for that matter). I know I had a cracked manifold on my chev trailblazer and tried to close with high temp jb weld and it didn’t last long which had ma 450 f rating continuous and 500+ intermittent ( not that I expected it to be intermittent on a manifold

Luke (aka Bitz)
 
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Vintage Don

Well Oiled
All-Star
Oct 9, 2017
3,496
Medina, Ohio
First Name
Don
Willys Model
  1. Pickup
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
I am leaning on the VHT satin gray for the motor. Satin black for the manifolds. Are you using flat or satin and are your manifolds different colors or just the nature of the surface.

You misunderstood, Luke, I must not have been clear. I only used this VHT paint on the fasteners and small bits for the manifold system, because it gets pretty warm.

I had my exhaust manifold coated a few months ago - took it to Cleveland - with some kind of ceramic/paint/powder coat process, which they're secretive about exactly what they do. Ain't cheap, but I've never had one rust back through. And the intake manifold I had previously brush-painted with some old Ford Model A engine paint - same as the rest of the engine.

I have learned some things: YES, you can get the oil line that goes up to the filter past the fuel pump when it's installed (several sources say you can't). But it does look like the little brass 90 fitting needs to be installed before the fuel pump goes on. Maybe you could get it in there, but it'd be challenging.

Also realized with the radiator out, it's no big deal to have the oil filter installed, and go on-and-off with the cylinder head - there's plenty of room to lay it over out of the way. So it doesn't matter which order you assemble those items.

I would do head then externals, if it were me.

But - I'm inclined to agree with Ken here, and set the Head back on first. Just seems "right."
 

Bitzf4

Precision Fit
All-Star
Oct 13, 2020
608
Hastings mn
First Name
Jim
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
You misunderstood, Luke, I must not have been clear. I only used this VHT paint on the fasteners and small bits for the manifold system, because it gets pretty warm.

I had my exhaust manifold coated a few months ago - took it to Cleveland - with some kind of ceramic/paint/powder coat process, which they're secretive about exactly what they do. Ain't cheap, but I've never had one rust back through. And the intake manifold I had previously brush-painted with some old Ford Model A engine paint - same as the rest of the engine.

I have learned some things: YES, you can get the oil line that goes up to the filter past the fuel pump when it's installed (several sources say you can't).

Also realized with the radiator out, it's no big deal to have the oil filter installed, and go on-and-off with the cylinder head - there's plenty of room to lay it over out of the way. So it doesn't matter which order you assemble those items.



But - I'm inclined to agree with Ken here, and set the Head back on first. Just seems "right."
Np my wife says that all the time. “No, you misunderstood what I said”
 

pixman

Bigger Hammer
Jul 24, 2019
132
Wadsworth Ohio
First Name
Jeffrey
Willys Model
  1. Other
Willys Year:
  1. Other
Nice work, Don.
Footnote: my timing was bad! She was gonna make fresh, homemade bread today. Like flour, and yeast and stuff - from scratch. But now that's been delayed.... Dang! Cause it's really GOOD!
View attachment 114342
Hope you finally got that fresh baked bread, Don! That's what I call SACRIFICE.
 

Vintage Don

Well Oiled
All-Star
Oct 9, 2017
3,496
Medina, Ohio
First Name
Don
Willys Model
  1. Pickup
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
@scramboleer that's simply wonderful - again! Yessir, the oven is just one more tool! haha

And on that topic - to put @pixman 's fears to rest - The Bride did indeed come through with a couple loaves of super-tasty Italian Ciabatta this afternoon, which went perfectly with her scratch-made spaghetti for dinner.

20220115_212614.jpg

20220115_212707.jpg

It is S-O-O-O hard to stay lean and mean at my proper fighting weight around here! This is why I walk my 2 miles every afternoon - even this afternoon, when it was only 19° outside (makes me go faster! haha) And the time spent walking (typically 32 - 33 minutes) is just another thing that takes me outta the Shop.

And I finally started getting just a few parts (very few) installed onto Chuffy's engine.....Yep, if I was any slower, I'd be going backwards.

.
 
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