never cry

55 willys

Gear Grinder
Joined
Mar 19, 2010
Messages
15
Location
hollister.ca
Willys Model
Willys Year:
#1
I work in a corrugaterplant (cardboard) w/ a german made machine. it seems like the germans don't belive in ANTI-SEIZE. it is a big pain in the ass ,for example, a steel 6mm bolt in a stainless threaded hole on the glue pan. first you find out who did that then you cut their hand off.we don't have alot of applications with tapered fittings but anti seize (never cry)has been used without any crying at PM time, hence the name NEVER CRY. is anti-sieze on the tapered axles a bad idea ? I hear no mention of it's use. the first time I removed the axel/brake hubs I was worried about the hub going into the wall,and had no issues, they came off with a small pop.well maybe next time it will be more exciting. the LH axel end taper and hub taper had some slight galling. maybe the hubs were not tightened engough with some dirt on the mating surfaces. alright to much hot air , any objections to anti-sieze (NEVER CRY)
 

64 Traveler

Sharpest Tool
All-Star
Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Messages
341
Location
Northern AZ
First Name
Kevin
Willys Model
Wagon
Willys Year:
1964
#2
When I still had tapered axles I used a little anti-seize on them and never had a problem. It's good stuff. :thumbupleft:
 

pavel6

Well Oiled
Joined
Sep 27, 2009
Messages
1,650
Location
Vancouver, BC
First Name
Pavel
Willys Model
Wagon
Willys Year:
1965
#3
I'm no engineer but always thought anti-seize was for use with threaded fasteners. The idea, again I thought, was the antiseize 'filled in the gaps' between the individual threads stopping corrosion. Now with a tapered union, surely the antiseize would just stop the two surfaces from properly seating, or would the taper just squeeze the compound out?
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2009
Messages
1,257
Willys Model
Willys Year:
#4
I have some experience with this one guys. I was jet engine mechanic in the service for 26 years. I learned what don't work. :)
1. Do not use anti sieze on a tapered surface. It will gall it up.
2. Do not use anti sieze on "cold" section threaded fasteners. You will regret it. Years and Years ago, I thought it would be a smart idea to use anti sieze on the lug nuts of my car. Boy was I wrong. It took forever to get those things off. Even with an impact wrench it took twice as long.
3. If you're going to use anti sieze on "hot" section threaded fasteners make sure the compound is rated for the proper hot section temperature. The wrong stuff will mess with you later.
4. When using antie sieze USE IT SPARINGLY. In fact - the more you goop on the worse it works. (how's that for good english?) :)

For sliding fittings, (such as a tapered axle would be) a spray on Moly coat or graphite would be the thing to use, BUT...it is NOT recomended for rotating parts. That being said, we all know that the drum/axle is for the most part a press fit. Adding a spray coating to a press fit would actually hinder the correct seating in most machined parts. Not a good idea. Since Willys was not an "exact" science we all have pretty much concluded that measurements vary and that's why we use shims for that area. How much would the spray lube throw things off?? I don't know. What I do know is that I personally would not use it for this application. Your choice.
Hope this helps.
Steve
 
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