Pickup question

mlatchaw

Bigger Hammer
Apr 8, 2021
110
Michigan
First Name
Marty
Willys Model
  1. Pickup
Willys Year:
  1. 1947
Four of the bolts that hold on the rear fenders are a bolt welded to a trapizoidal shaped washer. Restoring a 47 and want to be as original as possible. Those trapizoidal washer/bolts do not exsist on my truck. Can anyone tell me their dimentions so I can reproduce them? Also, do the bolts go thru the box to the fender with the nut in the wheel well or do they go from fender to the box with the nut under the floor of the box? Thanks in advance for your help.
 
To the wise men here, didn't Vintage Don illustrate building those washers in his build thread?
 
Marty - Is this what you are referring to?
https://www.oldwillysforum.com/forum/index.php?threads/‘62-truck-fender-attachment.28345/page-2#post-346084

index.php
 
Great! Thanks everyone, just what I needed. Now all I have to do is find a 5/16-24 carriage bolt.

It now looks obvious to me that these go in from the fender side with the nut under the floor of the box. Does that sound right?
 
Never mind that last question, I see from other photos attached to your reply that the bolt goes in from the box side with the nut in the wheel well.

Thanks a heap. Couldn't do this with out all of you. 3 years into this. Sheet metal welding almost done. Soon I will get to the fun part, putting it all together.
 
Hi Marty

Here is a set I made with Rogers help
and they work perfectly
 

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Where did you get the bolts? They look to be fine thread.
 
I will have the truck tomorrow and I can check
I am sure they were weld studs and I ground off the little
bumps
I did a lot of research on this but not I don' t remember
old age is a bitch


They were 5/16" x 24 per Freds Drawing
 

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Hi Marty

Here is a set I made with Rogers help
and they work perfectly
Randy, correct me if I am wrong, but I believe the studs are fixed [welded] to the trapezoid plate. The stud is inserted from the inside with a washer/nut on the outside. The trapezoid plate prevents the stud from rotating when tightening/loosening the nut because the edge of the trapezoid will rotate up against the box/frame structure, hence stopping it's rotation. These are missing from my 62 PU project, but my 70's Dodge Utiline had a similar system.

McMasterCarr.Com has these but only in 5/16-18
 
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I have purchased some 5/16-24 threaded rod. I'll see what I can come up with for a flat, round head to weld on. May not be a exact repo, but this is a driver, not a trailer queen.
 
May not be a exact repo, but this is a driver, not a trailer queen.
In which case I'd just drill a hole in a rectangular piece of flat material [for anti-rotation] and either weld a flange nut to it then bolt from the outside in, or weld a bolt in the flat plate and install it from the inside with a nut on the outside. The thread pitch would be of no concern. Just my opinion.
 
In which case I'd just drill a hole in a rectangular piece of flat material [for anti-rotation] and either weld a flange nut to it then bolt from the outside in, or weld a bolt in the flat plate and install it from the inside with a nut on the outside. The thread pitch would be of no concern. Just my opinion.
The studs are welded to the plate.
 
I realize I could make these special bolts out of coarse thread carriage bolts, but I can almost as easily make something that is closer to original. As I said earlier, this will not be a trailer queen when I'm done, but if I can make it more authentic, I will. I'm just saying. This is why we have red cars and green cars. We all get to choose.
 
I did something simlar not too long ago for the same reasons. I triple-nutted a piece of fine-thread rod leaving some excess showing and after lining up the nuts (no need to tighten them) put it in the vise with about 3/8" (maybe more?) sticking out past the top nut. I got the "stick-out" part glowing with the blue-tipped hot wrench and shaped a head with a hammer. After it cooled I fine-tuned the shape by chucking it up in a cordless drill and dressing it on the disc grinder and finished it off, in the areas that the disc grinder was too big to fit (under the head), with a file, still holding it in the drill. I needed just one and it took less than 15 minutes from inception to completion. I just wish I could remember what it is for and why I did it so I could post a picture. Eventually it will come to me...I'll post a picture then.

Another option would be to simply re-shape the head on a fully threaded fine-thread bolt, or even a carraige bolt, but I didn't do that because I needed the head to be bigger than the distance across the flats. Darn, I wish I could remember what I did this for!
 
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