oil pan. Dipstick

Piper

Bigger Hammer
Jul 15, 2022
30
Maine
First Name
ED
Willys Model
  1. Other
Willys Year:
  1. 1947
I took my oil pan off and painted it and put new gasket on it All the book i have says it take 4 quarts but 4 is just on the end of the dip stick. Also, i put the old oil in a gallon jug and I got a couple quarts left over Looks like they had 6 quarts in it Maybe the wrong dip stick is in it or it take more than 4 quarts Would you know how long the dip stick should be and if 4 quarts is right I am sorry if i am a pest but i need to know and you are the only person i know that knows anything about a 1937 Willy There is 2 1937 owner on the forum and anybody that can help I am putting some pictures of my engine I may not have a 1937 engine Block casing number is 641087-L-W11 No number behind the water pump Thanks in advance
 

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It looks like you have a more common version of the 134 from a late CJ2A or early CJ3A. You might have seen the original machining date on the oilpan mounting surface when you were cleaning it prior to reassembly.


Have you checked how far your dipstick tube is inderted into the block? It should be bottomed out. There were different dipsticks and tubes used over the years so you may have an odd combination too. I don't have one assembled right now that I could veryify, but I could measure the different dipsticks and tubes on what I have....not that it would do you any good. First thing to check though would be to compare with others here the distance from the cap mounting surface to the block of the tube.
 
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The dipstick is 16 inch long to the very top casing number is 641087 do you know what years they used this engine Thanks for helping
 

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6 qts will not hurt anything, fill to 6 and mark the dipstick...Phil
 
It looks like you have a more common version of the 134 from a late CJ2A or early CJ3A. You might have seen the original machining date on the oilpan mounting surface when you were cleaning it prior to reassembly.


Have you checked how far your dipstick tube is inderted into the block? It should be bottomed out. There were different dipsticks and tubes used over the years so you may have an odd combination too. I don't have one assembled right now that I could veryify, but I could measure the different dipsticks and tubes on what I have....not that it would do you any good. First thing to check though would be to compare with others here the distance from the cap mounting surface to the block of the tube.
The dipstick tube is all the way down It looks like I have a C-J 2A engine can you tell me what years they used them and how much oil they take Thanks Again
 
call it 5 qts Don't sell your engine short. I can send you a matching tube and dipstick. end your problem.
diggerG
 
Here’s a question that came to my mind.
I’ve never measured the depth of oil from the bottom of the pan or the offset of the rod journals & counter weights.
We all know our engines have key components pressure lubricated. And there is some ‘splash’ lubrication going on from the rotating crankshaft after the pressure oil passes through the main & rod journals. The cam lobes and tappet faces need oil.
What I’m curious to know is when the crankcase is full, do the rotating rod journals and crankshaft counterweights actually contact the surface of the oil and thus more splash?
 
Here’s a question that came to my mind.
...........................
What I’m curious to know is when the crankcase is full, do the rotating rod journals and crankshaft counterweights actually contact the surface of the oil and thus more splash?
No. In fact windage trays are used to reduce that effect in off-roading or circle-track racing, etc. If the crankshaft would slap the surface of the oil it would be like a continuous bellyflop....ouch! The baffle in the 134 oilpan has something to do with this for quick stops, but it's probably more to keep it from flying up the timing chain cover. We know it's not for countering the effects of extreme acceleration! I had a Briggs and Stratton engine that was lubricated exclusivly through splash and it had a tang that extended down from the rod that splashed the oil around, I assume so that the whole big end didn't have to.
 
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Some early engines (Chevys inline 6 ) used dipper rods to lubricate the connecting rod bearings.
 
Some early engines (Chevys inline 6 ) used dipper rods to lubricate the connecting rod bearings.
Called babitburners, real bad idea196, 208, 216, 235 cid 1930-1953 chevys, but not a windage tray...Phil
 
Like I suggested before, you have the wrong dipstick. The one I see is for a 2wd engine. The 4 wd should have a long tube that extends higher than your cyl. head. Start with that. Your cyl head is a late MB or CJ2A 3A head. By what I see the block is a 46 and up as well, because i see the flat area in front of the water pump for numbers. It may not have been stamped because it’s a factory replacement engine.
diggerG
 
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