help that body roll problem

roundss

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I saw this last week (i think) on spike's extreme 4x4. If you look further down the page there are universal sets. I know that the jeep they're showing has drivers side punkin' so that one won't work unless you're using that t-case or other running gear.

I think this looks like it could help with the problem of body roll when we do spring over conversions.
http://www.currieenterprises.com/CESTORE/antirock.aspx
 
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The link took me to the Currie AntiRock set up. I have run that and am doing so on both of my Jeeps. I cannot recommend that enough. That said they also provide excellent off road abilities.

I am not sure why SOA seems to be popular as it offers far more drawbacks than advantages as far as I understand...but I may not understand enough. :?:

I am also a strong proponent of Rancho RS9000X adjustable shocks. These can really help control sway and body roll. How well?

"On the last day in Pritchett Canyon, I snapped a Currie AntiRoc driver’s side sway bar control arm (aluminum first design). The result was I disconnected the other side and now was driving without an effective sway bar. Fine for the trail, but how would this affect the 500-mile trip back to Scottsdale.

I have driven locally without a sway bar en-route the car wash and I know it is a dodgey ride at best and just plain dangerous on the highway at speed. The thought was to push the speed until I felt uncomfortable and if need be spend the night making it a two-day trip. Much to my surprise the highway, handling was very good and by adding several increases in tighter shock valving I was able to drive home at speed safely. Truly a test of the springs and Rancho RS 9000X shocks and one in which they passed with excellence."
 

roundss

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SavageSun Willys said:
The link took me to the Currie AntiRock set up. I have run that and am doing so on both of my Jeeps. I cannot recommend that enough. That said they also provide excellent off road abilities.

I am not sure why SOA seems to be popular as it offers far more drawbacks than advantages as far as I understand...but I may not understand enough. :?:
Yep that's the link. From what I understand it's great on the trail by keeping the body roll to a min but allowing max articulation.

The SOA is so popular because of the extra 3-4" ya get.
 
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roundss said:
SavageSun Willys said:
The link took me to the Currie AntiRock set up. I have run that and am doing so on both of my Jeeps. I cannot recommend that enough. That said they also provide excellent off road abilities.

I am not sure why SOA seems to be popular as it offers far more drawbacks than advantages as far as I understand...but I may not understand enough. :?:
Yep that's the link. From what I understand it's great on the trail by keeping the body roll to a min but allowing max articulation.

The SOA is so popular because of the extra 3-4" ya get.
You can get an extra 3-4 without doing a SOA and NOT have the tippyness that the SOA brings along with other issues.
 

germain

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I used TJ front and rear sways, front will require holes to allow splash pan to sit low enough not to hide lower grill bar. See pic in my gallery, with front body off. Some creativity with brackets is required. Buy end links to length for the amount of lift you have, quick disconnects are useful also. Cut something, weld something!
 

roundss

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SavageSun Willys said:
roundss said:
[quote="SavageSun Willys":divieebb]The link took me to the Currie AntiRock set up. I have run that and am doing so on both of my Jeeps. I cannot recommend that enough. That said they also provide excellent off road abilities.

I am not sure why SOA seems to be popular as it offers far more drawbacks than advantages as far as I understand...but I may not understand enough. :?:
Yep that's the link. From what I understand it's great on the trail by keeping the body roll to a min but allowing max articulation.

The SOA is so popular because of the extra 3-4" ya get.
You can get an extra 3-4 without doing a SOA and NOT have the tippyness that the SOA brings along with other issues.[/quote:divieebb]

cool, how?
I don't plan on sticking with stock but if I find a spring under on the cheap I am interested.
I know you can do stuff, shackles, lift blocks, soa, diff springs, body lifts, but beyond that It's new to me.
 
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The reason why I do not care for SOA is due to my viewpoint...rock crawling. The SOA configuration get the rig up in the air and in a battle with gravity you are gonna lose. If you have no intention of rock crawling or just hitting the trails for fun then its not a big deal. That said what are you going to do with it?

Its not how high you lift it, its how you lift it high: Integrating things like re-arched springs, longer spring shackles and a body lift of 1 - 2 inch starts to get you up around 4 - 6 in all the while keeping your springs UNDER the axles. While seemingly the difference between under and over is but a few inches, the fact is the the fulcrum point of leverage on a side slope, the off-camber that will make a major difference. PLUS there is a impact on steering depending on how much you lift (note: this affects the steering components whether or not its spring under or over, but to a lesser degree on spring under).

Bottom line is asking your self how important if at all is stability and how often you encounter off-camber situations that could create issues like landing on your lid.
 

roundss

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SavageSun Willys said:
off-camber situations that could create issues like landing on your lid.
Landing on lid.................... bad.

Are there any newer, passenger side diff (for the front), spring under?

I've tried to think of how to classify the 4 wheeling I would do. I'll be hitting some nasty forest roads, some deep ruts (from washouts), with some off camber. Not planning on anything like the Rubicon, or slick rock..............but I'd like to be able to get out of a sticky situation.
 
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roundss said:
SavageSun Willys said:
off-camber situations that could create issues like landing on your lid.
Landing on lid.................... bad.

Are there any newer, passenger side diff (for the front), spring under?

I've tried to think of how to classify the 4 wheeling I would do. I'll be hitting some nasty forest roads, some deep ruts (from washouts), with some off camber. Not planning on anything like the Rubicon, or slick rock..............but I'd like to be able to get out of a sticky situation.
When I built my rock crawler the vogue was 6,8 and even 10 in lifts. I did a 3 in lift. That fad of big lifts did not last real long. Going over a curb could literally lay your rig over on its side.

In the top center of my windshield is a angle meter. It only goes to 45 degrees and I can and have pegged it many times. On one of the trails in Moab there is an obstacle called 'tip-over challenge'. I can do any section of it and few folks will even attempt it.

So the question really becomes how stability do you want...a SIMPLE question, yes? The answer is so complex that one could write a book on it and the last line would still be, 'well it depends'.

The higher you lift your rig the better to get over obstacles, yes? Well, not really. Your axle provides x amount of clearance and going 4, 6, 8 even 10 in beyond that often serves no purpose. 1) Thus my approach is get the axle off the ground first. Do this via tire size. Go from a 33 in tall tire to a 35 in tire and you gain 1 in in axle height/clearance.

Tire size is generally limited by the body. Install raised body pucks to get the body higher. I run an extra 2 in. You might also need to do some body trimming.

At this point in our rig we now have 3 in of gained height. Of that 3 in only 1 in has affected the overall CoG by about 90%. The body lift impacts CoG by about 25%.

2) Lets now reduce some of the impact on CoG. Rule of thumb. For every inch you lift your suspension you need to extend your wheel track by 1 1/2 in outward per side. You can put on wider axle sets, wheel spacers or even different backspacing in your chosen wheels. Generally you can pick up an inch on either side using wheels or wheel spacers.

3) Add spring shackles or more curved springs such as HD or those from trucks. Say 2 in worth.

Bottom line: 1 in added at the axle, 2 in at the body, 2 in at the frame = 5 in in total lift, wider track by 1 + 1 in for more stability: Result, 5 in, wider track and you are still stable and have more clearance.

BONUS: Many rigs have 'stuff' hanging down underneath. Typically this is the transfer case. Note this under any Jeep TJ that has not been altered. By adding a flatter 'belly skid' you can gain an extra 2 inches or more by tucking the transfer case up into the tunnel. We rock crawler do this on our TJs by adding a 1 in motor mount lift which brings the entire drive line up further into the tunnel. I call it free lift as it gives you an added 2 in of under-body clearance.
 
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