CJ-3A Build of "The Yellow Jeep" w Auto Shop Help

rocket

Well Oiled
Sep 3, 2015
3,278
Sierra Mtns
First Name
Rodney
Willys Model
  1. Wagon
Willys Year:
  1. 1963
Hey Scott. Sounds like a good start. I agree on the G503 videos. While I have a CJ much of what Steve puts out is applicable and well done. There are others with good info but sometimes painful to watch. There are some not only painful to watch but many things are just done wrong.
My only beef with Scott is his pronunciation of Willys. I really think he is right but prefer Willys (WillEs) myself. If I say I have a 48 Willis, most don’t have a clue

Bitz
I guess it all depends on what part of the Country you're from. WillEzz does sound better, and that is what I have always called them, But I did name my Wagon "Old Man Willis" And Jeff is correct about proper teminology.
 

scottragee

Sharpest Tool
Jun 18, 2021
203
Davis, CA
First Name
Scott
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1955
Scott, not to nit pick, but these kids need to learn to use the proper terminology. Our jeeps do not have transaxles, but they do have transfer cases. Huge difference, and if they go into the automotive repair field using the wrong terminology it could cost them a job during the itnerview process (don't ask me how I know!). In the most fundamental of explanations, the transaxle is a combined transmission and axle assembly (trans/axle) normally seen on front wheel drive cars. The transfer case is an additional transmission that selectively "transfers" a percentage (depending on its design, some can vary/slip) of the engine power to the front axle on a four wheel drive vehicle.

I agree with you about the G503 videos, especially as a teaching aid.
I appreciate the clarification. I've been using the two terms interchangeably. Will correct that.
 

scottragee

Sharpest Tool
Jun 18, 2021
203
Davis, CA
First Name
Scott
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1955
Hey Scott. Sounds like a good start. I agree on the G503 videos. While I have a CJ much of what Steve puts out is applicable and well done. There are others with good info but sometimes painful to watch. There are some not only painful to watch but many things are just done wrong.
My only beef with Scott is his pronunciation of Willys. I really think he is right but prefer Willys (WillEs) myself. If I say I have a 48 Willis, most don’t have a clue

Bitz
I had never heard it pronounced "Willis" until finding the G503 videos (and a couple of others). And I agree, that correct or not, if you don't pronounce it 'Willeez" no one will know what you are talking about.
 

JABJEEP

Well Oiled
Sep 20, 2017
1,306
Under a jeep in SE Wisconsin
First Name
Jeff
Willys Model
  1. Wagon
  2. Pickup
  3. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1955
  2. 1958
  3. 1962
Sure thing. Send me your address and we’ll get a piece in the mail for you
The chunk of steering wheel arrived today! Thanks! It looks like a hard, black rubber so I wonder whether it's the acetate stuff or the rubber stuff; I guess both materials were used back then. When I get to that point in my restoration and I'm "rendering" acetate I'll post the results here. Thank you again!!!!!
 

scottragee

Sharpest Tool
Jun 18, 2021
203
Davis, CA
First Name
Scott
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1955
The chunk of steering wheel arrived today! Thanks! It looks like a hard, black rubber so I wonder whether it's the acetate stuff or the rubber stuff; I guess both materials were used back then. When I get to that point in my restoration and I'm "rendering" acetate I'll post the results here. Thank you again!!!!!
You are very welcome my friend
 

Bitzf4

Sharpest Tool
All-Star
Oct 13, 2020
328
Hastings mn
First Name
Jim
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
You are very welcome my friend
Hi Scott. Ditto on the chunk, mine also arrived. I will compare it to the small pieces I have left from my removed (via cutting wheel) steering wheel and see how that works. My wheel from Digger has lots of small chunks gone but main purpose of it was to be able to steer until ready for a replacement when all back together
Jabjeep are you going to try and heat a piece up? Oven or flame or ? If so.
Bitz
 

Stakebed

Well Oiled
All-Star
Mar 4, 2020
6,010
Northern California
First Name
Joe
Willys Model
  1. Pickup
Willys Year:
  1. 1957
The chunk of steering wheel arrived today! Thanks! It looks like a hard, black rubber so I wonder whether it's the acetate stuff or the rubber stuff; I guess both materials were used back then. When I get to that point in my restoration and I'm "rendering" acetate I'll post the results here. Thank you again!!!!!
As I've written, when I was grinding on my steering wheel, it smelled like burning rubber. I believe our wheels were made from hardened rubber.
 

Bitzf4

Sharpest Tool
All-Star
Oct 13, 2020
328
Hastings mn
First Name
Jim
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
If that’s the case then this might be a fool’s errand. I should have some shop time tomorrow. I’ll do some ‘sparementing
Mine appears to be phenolic (Bakelite) but maybe just 75 years old. Stakebed are you thinking the GPW types are different than the “newer” wheels
Bitz
 

Stakebed

Well Oiled
All-Star
Mar 4, 2020
6,010
Northern California
First Name
Joe
Willys Model
  1. Pickup
Willys Year:
  1. 1957
Mine appears to be phenolic (Bakelite) but maybe just 75 years old. Stakebed are you thinking the GPW types are different than the “newer” wheels
Bitz
All I am offering is that my Willys truck wheel smelled like rubber. I make no other conclusions.
 

scottragee

Sharpest Tool
Jun 18, 2021
203
Davis, CA
First Name
Scott
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1955
Five days into Auto Shop . . .

Dry compression test (albeit on a cold engine): 83, 90, 90, & 93 psi
Spec. is for 90 to 110.
Wet compression test
: all came up between 100 and 105
I consider that encouraging!
In the process, Mr. Thayer taught our group about the elec. current needed to power the starter solenoid and let it do its job.

Leak-down test: Working at finding TDC. The distributor I have is not original but is a solid-state elec. type (looks like it might have come from KaiserWillys or Walcks - looks the same as the pictures on those sites). Hope to wrap that up today. Once this teaching opportunity is completed we'll resume removing the engine, transmission, and transaxle.

Students have Chromebooks (one at each rolling toolbox) for looking at videos. There is also Mr. Thayer's laptop connected to a bigger screen in the classroom. Watching a video as a group around a Chromebook (small screen) with the noise of the other groups at work in other bays is less than ideal, but still has its merits.

Photos: I've hoped to catch a group photo so you can "meet" the students, but time flies by, and when the bell rings, it is "Clean up and Go".
Sooner or later we'll get that accomplished.

Radiator: Just dropped that off at a shop nearby. The shop owner also has a CJ from the mid-60's. He'll discover for me what kind of shape the radiator is in. It too looks like it came from KaiserWillys or Walcks - too good of shape to be the original.
 

JABJEEP

Well Oiled
Sep 20, 2017
1,306
Under a jeep in SE Wisconsin
First Name
Jeff
Willys Model
  1. Wagon
  2. Pickup
  3. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1955
  2. 1958
  3. 1962
If that’s the case then this might be a fool’s errand. I should have some shop time tomorrow. I’ll do some ‘sparementing
Well…. I did the experiment. It must be the rubber/bakelight material. The acetone removed the paint in less than an hour, even the paint above the “water line” but has had no effect whatsoever on the base material. Thanks Scott. I guess I’ll know better next time to differentiate between the bakelight and the acetate material.

Remember, transfer case!
 

Bitzf4

Sharpest Tool
All-Star
Oct 13, 2020
328
Hastings mn
First Name
Jim
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1948
So been
Well…. I did the experiment. It must be the rubber/bakelight material. The acetone removed the paint in less than an hour, even the paint above the “water line” but has had no effect whatsoever on the base material. Thanks Scott. I guess I’ll know better next time to differentiate between the bakelight and the acetate material.

Remember, transfer case!
thinking about this whole concept of mixing some “dust” with acetone to make an epoxy for lack of a better term. Either the bulk material to acetone must be really high or it will just flow like acetone. Is that what happened on your science project ?
 

scottragee

Sharpest Tool
Jun 18, 2021
203
Davis, CA
First Name
Scott
Willys Model
  1. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1955
Well…. I did the experiment. It must be the rubber/bakelight material. The acetone removed the paint in less than an hour, even the paint above the “water line” but has had no effect whatsoever on the base material. Thanks Scott. I guess I’ll know better next time to differentiate between the bakelight and the acetate material.

Remember, transfer case!
Funny . . .I thought I was being careful to make the correct differentiation. I'll plead dyslexia!
Transfer case, transfer case, transfer case.
 

JABJEEP

Well Oiled
Sep 20, 2017
1,306
Under a jeep in SE Wisconsin
First Name
Jeff
Willys Model
  1. Wagon
  2. Pickup
  3. CJ
Willys Year:
  1. 1955
  2. 1958
  3. 1962
N
Is that what happened on your science project ?
No, nothing happened because the donor steering wheel (from a CJ) was made out of a different material than the WWII jeep steering wheels are made of. I don't know what the truck and wagon wheels are, but my guess is the acetate material.
 
Top